Polish Genealogical Society of Michigan

Mailing Address

PGSM
PO Box 85987
Westland, MI 48185-6087 USA
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1.  
Genealogy is incredibly personal.
[Located in Category: Basic Information]
2.  
The inaccuracy of early maps and land grants often created land disputes in New England’s Colonial era.
[Located in Category: Land Records]
3.  
You'll find deeds in county courthouses except in New England states where you should find them in local town halls.
[Located in Category: Land Records]
4.  
Wikis are not databases of ancestors' names, photos, family stories, or pedigrees.
[Located in Category: Organization]
5.  
Wikis are tools for finding information about subjects and records that may have been generated about your ancestors, and the places in which records might be found. They are vast information depositories.
[Located in Category: Organization]
6.  
What is a Wiki? A website that provides collaborative revision of its content and structure directly from the web browser by communities of editors and contributors that write documents collaboratively.
[Located in Category: Organization]
7.  
Set up a separate email address for your genealogy research using email products like gmail and yahoo. This way if you ever change your Internet provider, your still have a generic email address that individuals can reach you at.
[Located in Category: Organization]
8.  
Genealogy is an incredible way to make a connection with the past.
[Located in Category: Basic Information]
9.  
Historical societies vary in specialization, with focuses ranging from specific geographical areas such as countries or towns, universities, railways, ethnic and religious groups, to genealogy, pioneer history, and the preservation of antiques or historic buildings.
[Located in Category: Basic Information]
10.  
A historical society is an organization dedicated to preserving, collecting, researching, and interpreting historical information or items. Originally, these societies were created as a way to help future generations understand their heritage.
[Located in Category: Basic Information]
11.  
Some "one-namers" may restrict their research geographically, perhaps to one country, but to register a surname with the Guild a member must commit to researching on a world-wide basis.
[Located in Category: Basic Information]
12.  
A one-name study is a project researching all occurrences of a surname, as opposed to a particular pedigree (ancestors of one person) or descendency (descendants of one person or couple).
[Located in Category: Basic Information]
13.  
Family organizations or associations centered on a more distant common ancestor are often referred to as "ancestral family organizations," while those centered on a commonly shared surname are commonly referred to as "single surname family organizations".
[Located in Category: Basic Information]
14.  
A family association or family organization is formed by people who share a common ancestor or surname.
[Located in Category: Basic Information]
15.  
Lineage societies are societies that limit their membership to descendants of a particular person or group of people of historical importance.
[Located in Category: Basic Information]
16.  
Genealogy Society, which may be called a Family History Society in other countries, is a society, often charitable or not-for-profit, that allows member genealogists and family historians to profit from shared knowledge.
[Located in Category: Basic Information]
17.  
Keep track of searches you have done.
[Located in Category: Internet]
18.  
Provide a definition of a keyword. You must insert a space between the colon and the query in order for this operator to work in Yahoo and Bing. Example: define: genealogy
[Located in Category: Internet]
19.  
Search for the word in the title of the webpage. This may capture some additional genealogy web pages about the surname usually buried deep in the search results. Example: allintitle: fox genealogy.
[Located in Category: Internet]
20.  
Fuzzy searches may be done using the tilde “ ~ ” symbol searching for a term similar in spelling to a name, location or word. For example: smith~
[Located in Category: Internet]
21.  
Boolean logic consists of three basic logical operators: AND (+) John AND Smith; NOT (-) John NOT Smith; OR John OR Smith, Smith OR John.
[Located in Category: Internet]
22.  
Boolean [Bool·e·an ] logic refers to the logical relationship among search terms, and is named for the British-born Irish mathematician George Boole.
[Located in Category: Internet]
23.  
Online searches - The order you put your search words affects the responses you get.
[Located in Category: Internet]
24.  
Using Clouds Services - Be sure to read the Terms and Agreement. You need to due your due diligence and investigate the security practices in place with the cloud.
[Located in Category: Internet]
25.  
Check out genealogy mobile apps for your smartphones and tables.
[Located in Category: Internet]
26.  
Use Cloud Services to access your genealogy information anywhere in the world.
[Located in Category: Internet]
27.  
Book to consider for your personal genealogy reference library: The Family Tree Historical Newspapers Guide: How to Find Your Ancestors in Archived Newspapers by Jim Beidler.
[Located in Category: Books]
28.  
Add Social Networking to Your Research. Look for Message Boards and Mailing Lists, Blogs, Wikis, Facebook, Google+, GenealogyWise, Geni and Twitter.
[Located in Category: Internet]
29.  
Add Social Networking to Your Research.
[Located in Category: Basic Information]
30.  
Search smart ~ have a plan!
[Located in Category: Internet]
31.  
Before ordering a book through Inter Library Loan (ILL), try searching for it using a Search Engine as well as in Google Books or at the FamilySearch website.
[Located in Category: Books]
32.  
Be sure you cite your sources!
[Located in Category: Sources - Citations]
33.  
Understand the history of the area you are searching on.
[Located in Category: Basic Information]
34.  
Look for places, not just people.
[Located in Category: Basic Information]
35.  
Go beyond genealogy websites. Try county histories, biographies, etc.
[Located in Category: Basic Information]
36.  
Try multiple databases.
[Located in Category: Internet]
37.  
Don’t limit yourself in how you enter a name in your search. Try given name – surname, as well as surname – given name.
[Located in Category: Internet]
38.  
Is there an unusual name in your family? Use that in a search. Collateral relatives can be a plus in finding what you’re looking for.
[Located in Category: Internet]
39.  
Don’t forget to use spelling variations of your ancestors’ names.
[Located in Category: Internet]
40.  
Too general or too broad a search will result in too many hits to be useful.
[Located in Category: Internet]
41.  
Read the “How To/”About Us”/”Help” of a website to determine what search and wildcards can be used, i.e. Boolean searches.
[Located in Category: Internet]
42.  
Can't find that website you visited in the past? Try using "Wayback Machine" at .
[Located in Category: Internet]
43.  
Use multiple search engines online.
[Located in Category: Internet]
44.  
Prepare a list of key words to use in your search, i.e. genealogy, family research, a specific location, surnames to use, other spellings of surnames, uncommon given names in family, timeframe, etc. to help narrow down your search.
[Located in Category: Internet]
45.  
Make a list of what information you want to find.
[Located in Category: Basic Information]
46.  
Prepare a Timeline to determine the missing information or “brickwalls” of your ancestor.
[Located in Category: Internet]
47.  
Prepare a Genealogical Memorandum to Your Last Will and Testament to make arrangements where your research goes, other than the circular file.
[Located in Category: Basic Information]
48.  
Prepare a storm protection program(i.e. weather conditions, fire, computer crashes, etc.) for your research.
[Located in Category: Basic Information]
49.  
Expect to collect lots of papers.
[Located in Category: Basic Information]
50.  
Don’t wear research blinders; keep an open mind when researching.
[Located in Category: Brick Walls]